DAILY LIVING & MOBILITY

Hold onto hope, Accept Reality or Do a Little Bit of Both?

Cerebral Palsy (CP)

Aly Brown

Surgery and Cerebral Palsy

Today (2/15/18) marks three months since the last night my body was structured in the way I adapted to use it for 20 years. November 16, 2017 and the months following were days I will never forget. As I have said many times before I was supposed to stay in the hospital one night with the ability to stand/walk as much as I was able the days following. However, I stayed a month and am still adjusting to “normal” life again. School started getting back to normal a few weeks ago. What a crazy ride that has been, but my body and personal life have a while to go. I have scars that I’ve lost count over and am still accepting the way they look and are healing. I am able to stand, but am not able to walk or make transfers independently yet. I also need a stair lift because I can no longer move around on my knees.

Reaching Goals

Not being able to move independently or conquer my dream of walking better and in the timeline I had for myself is driving me nuts. I have always put a time limit on my goals because I always knew I could do better than what society thought I could. I believe that happens to everyone, but even more often for those with situations that may or may not change. I continued to give myself a time limit on things until my best friend called me last night. I was all excited to run a race in memory of another friend and also walk across the stage at my next graduation with my new legs; to prove to myself and everyone that any goal and situation is possible to get through. The race at that time was nine months away, so I thought I had plenty of time to heal, but as the days and months continue to tick away and my progress is still dragging on I wish I could snap my fingers and make everything better just in time for the race. Last night, my best friend made me realize that even though walking at big events such as this is a great goal it doesn’t matter how I contribute to the situation (walk or use my wheelchair), it’s about the fact that I made it there and I continue not to give up on my dreams.

What my Cerebral Palsy surgery has taught me

Cerebral Palsy and my recent surgery have taught me that life shouldn’t be about the way in which you get things done, but rather that you got them done and feel happy and as if you made a difference. Be PROUD of each of your accomplishments and LIVE life with joy and thankfulness in your heart no matter your situation.

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